New stories

If you have something you’d like to see transformed and given a new life, Sally would love to hear from you. With her experience, sensitivity and talent, she can create a meaningful work of art that will open the door to your memories.

New stories

If you have something you’d like to see transformed and given a new life, Sally would love to hear from you. With her experience, sensitivity and talent, she can create a meaningful work of art that will open the door to your memories.

She who embroiders cracks

open the doors to memory

and the discovery

of exceptional worlds...

Perhaps the art that resonates the most vividly with each person comes from within, from their own pasts and memories.
Keepsakes are a very human way to honour events and loved ones. Tokens compress entire stories and when seen, that energy bursts forth and lives again.
The heart's archives, even torn and frayed, vibrate with meaning. Scraps of fabric, buttons, beads, ribbons, jewellery, photos, even a dried blossom can come together in a work of art to celebrate each unique memory and breathe new life into the treasures of our past.

Story of a chair (testimony)

 

Some of my earliest memories are of the printed fabrics around me. My mother, an intrepid seamstress, dabbled in upholstery. Each time she recovered the seats of the dining room table chairs, she left the last fabric underneath. When she died I kept many of her things – clothes, jewellery, and furniture. Now the seats of those chairs are so worn and dirty, even my laissez-faire beliefs about housekeeping are offended. Out of nostalgia I wanted to keep and honour those fabrics. I'm also a seamstress, but my emotional closeness to the textiles and my past makes me the wrong person to recycle and revive those materials.

I have long admired Sally's work. She has an impressive range of skills, a keen eye, creative vision, and puts heart-felt attention into her art. I am packaging up a box of those fabrics (which stretch back almost 60 years) with bits of lace, trim, and yarn from my mother's sewing box. The idea of those memories being seen with a fresh eye, combined, and transformed into art is both a thrill and consolation to me.

Open the doors to memory ?

Story of a chair (testimony)

 

Some of my earliest memories are of the printed fabrics around me. My mother, an intrepid seamstress, dabbled in upholstery. Each time she recovered the seats of the dining room table chairs, she left the last fabric underneath. When she died I kept many of her things – clothes, jewellery, and furniture. Now the seats of those chairs are so worn and dirty, even my laissez-faire beliefs about housekeeping are offended. Out of nostalgia I wanted to keep and honour those fabrics. I'm also a seamstress, but my emotional closeness to the textiles and my past makes me the wrong person to recycle and revive those materials.
I have long admired Sally's work. She has an impressive range of skills, a keen eye, creative vision, and puts heart-felt attention into her art. I am packaging up a box of those fabrics (which stretch back almost 60 years) with bits of lace, trim, and yarn from my mother's sewing box. The idea of those memories being seen with a fresh eye, combined, and transformed into art is both a thrill and consolation to me.

 

Open the doors to memory ?

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